Brazilian Blowout Frequently Asked Questions

Q. Who is the best candidate for the Brazilian Blowout?
A. It has been our experience, that good candidates for the Brazilian Blowout are anyone who has frizzy, damaged or processed hair. We have performed the treatment on every hair type (fine/course/frizzy/curly), as well as hair that has been permed, Japanese straightened and extensions. In doing so, we have found that with proper communication and a well considered application, everyone can benefit from the Brazilian Blowout smoothing treatment.

Q. What kind of look will you get from the Brazilian Blowout?
A. The hair will be left totally frizz-free, shiny, effortlessly manageable and with plenty of body and bounce. There will still be the option to wear hair curly/wavy (depending on the hair type) and the freedom to blow dry hair smooth and straight in a fraction of the time invested prior to receiving the treatment.

Q. Can I still receive a Brazilian Blowout if I have highlights and/or color?
A. Yes, the Brazilian Blowout will actually improve the health of color-treated/highlighted hair by conditioning the hair while sealing the cuticle for enhanced color, reduced frizz and radiant shine.

Q. Is the Brazilian Blowout going to make my hair straight?
A. If your hair is wavy, the Brazilian Blowout will make your hair appear naturally straight and healthy. If your hair is very curly, it will minimize frizz while enhancing the appearance of the natural wave/curl. If you have straight, frizzy hair, this treatment will eliminate frizz and promote radiant shine.

Q. How long does the Brazilian Blowout last?
A. The Brazilian Blowout will last for 10-12 weeks if the Açai After-Care Maintenance product line is used. The Brazilian Blowout is a cumulative treatment, in that the more you receive it, the healthier the hair will be and the longer the result will last.

Q. Can you apply the Brazilian Blowout directly on top of other relaxers and strengtheners?
A. Yes. The Brazilian Blowout actually works best on chemically treated hair, and helps to improve the hairs condition by fortifying each strand with essential amino acids. The Brazilian Blowout works great directly on top of a relaxer. Perform the relaxer first, Brazilian Blowout next, and then neutralize at the very end of both treatments. The Brazilian Blowout is great to perform when someone is trying to move away from having relaxers or Japanese straighteners. It puts movement back into the hair, allowing the hair to look its best.

Q. Will my hair lose volume if I receive the Brazilian Blowout?
A. No, your hair will not lose volume as a result of receiving the Brazilian Blowout. Your hair will maintain its natural volume and you will still receive great bend and memory when blow-drying and/or using a curling iron.

Q. Can you color your hair the same day you receive a Brazilian Blowout?
A. Yes, however, you must color your hair prior to having the Brazilian Blowout smoothing treatment.

Beware of “copycat” Brazilian Blowout. Please share. To find a certified Brazilian Blowout salon, please contact Beauty Lane Philippines (https://www.facebook.com/beautylanephl), as they are the sole distributor of the Original Brazilian Blowout in the Philippines.

 

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Humidity can wreak havoc on your hair if you let it. Luckily, even a small change in your hair care routine can tame puffy hair; specially-made products as well as home remedies round out the attack. If you don’t want to settle with puffy, lawless hair on a humid day, you should be able to help matters.

Part 1 of 3: Everyday Hair Care in Humid Environments

  1. Get the right cut. If you live in an area that is known for humid weather, consider getting a haircut that caters to your hair type. Long hair and straight cuts add the weight needed to pull down hair that would otherwise puff out. An angled or slightly layered cut will remove some of the bulk. A layered cut will emphasize curls, but could result in puffier hair.
  2. Shampoo at most every other day. Shampoo is great for cleaning dirt and grime away from hair, but it’s not so great at taming puffy hair. That’s because shampoo strips your hair of its natural oils, which make your hair silken and combat frizz. Some people go for as long as a week in between shampooing.[1] The exact amount of time is up to you, but the consensus is that waiting a couple days between washes produces healthier, less puffy hair.
  3. When conditioning after shampoo, wash off conditioner using cold water. There’s some debate about how effective this is, but the idea is pretty simple: cold water causes the cuticles of the hair to contract, simultaneously adding shine and taming frizz.[2] Some scientists, however, doubt the effectiveness of cold water on the scalp, saying that since hair cuticles aren’t living cells, they shouldn’t contract.[3] The debate aside, this advice shouldn’t cause puffy hair, so try it out and see if it works. As discussed below, certain specially-designed leave-in conditioners can help fight puffy hair.
  4. Dry hair gently. If your hair is prone to fly-aways and frizzes, carefully blot your hair dry with the towel instead of rubbing. Allow hair to air-dry as much as possible to reduce the amount of puffiness in your hair. If you blow your hair dry, avoid a lot of movement with the blow dryer. Blow your hair dry slowly and in small sections on the lowest heat setting. Remember to blow down the shaft of hair instead of across it, which separates hair sections, or upward, which provides volume and lift but also adds puffiness to frizzy hair. Keep in mind that blow drying removes moisture from the hair strands, which increases frizz.
  5. Avoid over-combing your hair. It can be tempting to smooth out your hair with plenty of brushstrokes after stepping out of the shower. But brushing or combing your hair causes friction, which causes heat and breakage to the hair cuticle.[4] This leads to puffy or frizzy hair. Instead of combing your hair like you’ve entered a contest, use a wide-toothed comb or a paddle brush with ball-tipped ends. Finish off with a light pass using your fingers as a comb.
  6. Decide on a style for the day that works with your natural hair type. In humid weather, you hair will tend to do what it naturally wants to do. Fighting your hair type will probably cause you a lot of frustration; chances are you’ll end up losing every time. If your hair is straight, avoid the urge to put it in curlers on humid days. If your hair is naturally curly or wavy, work with the waves instead of opting for a straight style.
    1. Try tying your hair up in a bun or ponytail and finish off by applying some anti-frizz gel.
      If you’re having a truly tremendous hair day, never underestimate the help a hat or well-tied scarf can do for your hair.
Continue reading “How to Prevent Puffy Hair in Humid Weather”

Humid air causes hydrogen bonds to form between water molecules and the proteins in your hair, triggering curls and frizz.

If you have long hair, you probably don’t need to look up a weather report to get an idea of how much humidity’s in the air: You can simply grab a fistful of hair and see how it feels. Human hair is extremely sensitive to humidity—so much that some hygrometers (devices that indicate humidity) use a hair as the measuring mechanism, because it changes in length based on the amount of moisture in the air.

Straight hair goes wavy. If you have curly hair, humidity turns it frizzy or even curlier. Taming the frizz has become a mega industry, with different hair smoothing serums promising to “transform” and nourish hair “without weighing hair down.” But just why does humidity have this strange effect on human hair?

Hair Cross Section

Hair’s chemical structure, as it turns out, makes it unusually susceptible to changes in the amount of hydrogen present in the air, which is directly linked to humidity. Most of a hair’s bulk is made up of bundles of long keratin proteins, represented as the middle layer of black dots tightly packed together in the cross-section at right.

These keratin proteins can be chemically bonded together in two different ways. Molecules on neighboring keratin strands can form a disulfide bond, in which two sulfur atoms are covalently bonded together. This type of bond is permanent—it’s responsible for the hair’s strength—and isn’t affected by the level of humidity in the air.

But the other type of connection that can form between adjacent keratin proteins, a hydrogen bond, is much weaker and temporary, with hydrogen bonds breaking and new ones forming each time your hair gets wet and dries again. (This is the reason why, if your hair dries in one shape, it tends to remain in roughly that same shape over time.)

Hydrogen bonds occur when molecules on neighboring keratin strands each form a weak attraction with the same water molecule, thereby indirectly bonding the two keratin proteins together. Because humid air has much higher numbers of water molecules than dry air, a given strand of hair can form much higher numbers of hydrogen bonds on a humid day. When many such bonds are formed between the keratin proteins in a strand of hair, it causes the hair to fold back on itself at the molecular level at a greater rate.

On the macro level, this means that naturally curly hair as a whole becomes curlier or frizzier due to humidity. As an analogy, imagine the metal coil of a spring. If you straighten and dry your hair, it’ll be like the metal spring, completely straightened out into a rod. But if it’s a humid day, and your hair is prone to curling, water molecules will steadily be absorbed and incorporated into hydrogen bonds, inevitably pulling the metal rod back into a coiled shape.

Click here to find out on how to help prevent Puffy Hair in Humid Weather

1. Will coloring make my hair fall out?

The answer is an emphatic “NO.” There is no scientific evidence that hair coloring causes extra hair loss, and there is no physiological reason why it should do so.

During my many years of practice in my London and New York clinics, I have never been able to associate hair loss with coloring. I did an eight-month study involving 30 women and three men, who all underwent various types of hair coloring, and none showed signs of extra hair loss. A bad color job, however, can cause hair breakage, which may be confused with extra hair loss.

2. Will coloring make my hair thinner?

The answer again is “No.” So many women (and men for that matter) come to me with thinned hair and blame it on the color: “It’s only since I started coloring that I have noticed my hair is thinner,” they say. This is coincidental; many women start coloring when their hair is turning gray, or when the color is not as vibrant. They are often at the age, unfortunately, when the hair can begin to thin for other reasons, but they blame it on the coloring. Or, they start coloring their hair at a young age and notice the hair is thinner when they are in their 30s and 40s, again blaming coloring. But it would have thinned anyway.

3. Coloring my hair makes it dry; what can I do?

Coloring can dry the hair — permanent color and bleach in particular.

While semi-permanent color doesn’t dry it out as much as permanent, repeated use can cause dry ends. Always use a moisture-balancing or remoisturizing shampoo and conditioner, and a deep, remoisturizing hair mask once or twice a week depending on the dryness. Always apply a leave-in conditioning cream (non-greasy) before blow-drying. And remember not to over-dry or over-brush.

Daily shampooing and conditioning will not dry your hair providing you choose the correct products.

4. What should I look for in a hair color product?

Choose your color from the packet or swatch on display. Colors may change according to fashion, but the basic chemistry of coloring agents has not changed much over the years.

They all have similar ingredients, so there’s no point reading the label.

However, the best person to advise you is your hairdresser, and the best place to have hair color done is in a salon.

5. Should I choose permanent or semi-permanent color?

In the long term, permanent hair color is best, which may surprise you when you take into account the extra peroxide and ammonia it might contain. The reason is that permanent color should only be applied to the new hair growth at the roots, briefly overlapping with the previously dyed hair.

Semi-permanent color, on the other hand, is applied to the whole head each time, because of the more rapid fading.

This results in repeated full-head applications, so the ends finish up darker than the roots. If, for example, your hair is an average 10 inches long, the ends of your hair, at half an inch a month growth, would be 20 months old.

Therefore, a monthly, semi-permanent color treatment means that the ends of the hair would have suffered 20 applications!

6. Is it safe to have my hair colored during pregnancy? 

Yes. All women want to look their best when they’re pregnant, and whatbetter way to boost morale than to have your hair the way you want?

7. Can hair colorants cause cancer? 

There are recurring scares about hair colorings causing bladdercancer. The first was about 25 years ago and the latest in 2002. Therewere some studies that indicated a link, but none could besubstantiated on humans. Each study was similar: The hair of mice wasshaved daily and hair color was applied to their skin. After threemonths (100 applications), most of the mice had bladder cancer. I thinkit is unreasonable to base a link on this method of testing as dailyapplications on shaved skin would seriously affect absorption rates.Evidence that hair coloring is safe has been demonstrated in two majorstudies by the American Cancer Society and Harvard University.

The verdict? “The overall evidence excluded any appreciable andmeasurable risk of bladder cancer from personal use of hair dye.” So,would I let my family use it? Absolutely.

8. Is using a hair color likely to give me a rash? 

There is a possibility, but not if you go about it correctly.All hair dye packaging recommends carrying out a skin patch test beforeusing a colorant.

Apply the color to an area the size of a quarter, behind an earor inner elbow. If, after 24 hours, there is no irritation, discomfortor redness, it is safe to color without risk of a rash or reaction.When you read about people suffering severe allergic reactions, it ismost likely that the patch-test warnings have been ignored in thesecases. As it is estimated that only one in 250,000 people may besensitive to hair color, it is not surprising that the patch test isoften ignored. But, take heed, you may be that one in 250,000.

9. Can hair coloring give me a dry and itchy scalp? 

Many women have existing flaky and itchy scalp conditions and blame their hair color. In my answer to question one, I mentioned aneight-month study I conducted to establish that hair coloring does notcause thinning or hair loss. Many of the people I was going to pick forthe study already had scalp problems flaking, itching or tenderness, soI was reluctant to include them because of the possibility ofaggravating the condition. Of those I did include, though, all hadimproved scalps after coloring their hair! This was probably due to theantiseptic effect of the peroxide. While I am not suggesting that haircolor can be used to improve a scalp condition, these results certainlyindicate a good, rather than a bad, reaction if you have a flaky scalp.However, coloring should definitely be avoided on scratched or veryirritated skin conditions.

10. I don’t want to use peroxide or ammonia. What else can I use to color my hair? 

The obvious coloring agents to use in this case would bevegetable colors such as henna or camomile. These have manydisadvantages, though: The colors they produce are not natural-lookingand they fade very quickly, leading to more frequent applications,unnatural colors and, ultimately, drier, brittle hair. Also, in asimilar way to semi-permanent colors, there is a continual overlap inapplication, leading to an unnatural appearance — particularly on theends.

To obtain natural-looking hair color, peroxide and ammonia areneeded, as without these ingredients your color will not take as well,look as good, or last as long. There are specific reasons for theirinclusion that involve complicated hair and ingredient chemistry.

Provided you take sufficient care before, during and after thedying process, there is no reason why you shouldn’t have the best ofall worlds: beautiful, long-lasting color and well-conditioned hair.

Bleaching can leave your hair with mild to severe damage due to acidic action of strong chemicals or wrong handling or extreme heat application during the procedure. The ruined hair might feel dry, spongy, porous, brittle or rough due to damaged hair cuticles which cover the cortex, carrying the hair’s natural color. While store-bought potion and products might help repair the condition, there are quite a few easy, natural ways to get your hair healthy after bleaching.

1. Shampoo your hair less often. In order to restore your bleached hair, you will have to discontinue washing your hair daily. When you shampoo your hair, you are not only cleaning the hair but you are also stripping the natural oils and sebum from your hair. The oils and sebum are natural moisturizers. If your hair is prone to looking and feeling oily, use a dry shampoo on the days that you don’t wash your hair.

2. Deep condition your hair one or more times per week. The amount that you condition your hair depends on how often your hair needs it. Apply deep conditioner to your hair after you have already washed it with shampoo and regular conditioner. Use a wide-toothed comb to distribute it through your hair. Warm a towel in the dryer or with a hair dryer. Wrap your hair with the warm towel. Leave the deep conditioner and towel on your hair for 30 minutes. Wash it completely out of your hair.

3. Always wash hair with lukewarm or cold water. Hot water promotes dryness in the hair. That is counterproductive to restoring bleached hair as your goal is to add moisture to your hair. If you wash hair with lukewarm water, always rinse your hair with cold water at the very end. That will seal the cuticle.

4. Use a leave-in conditioner after every time that you wash your hair. As bleached hair is often porous and prone to tangles, a leave-in conditioner adds moisture and makes hair easier to comb. That will prevent strands of hair from breaking off.

5. Do not use heat on your hair. Avoid using blow dryers, hot rollers, flat irons and curling irons. Heat is detrimental to restoring your bleached hair. If you are not willing to forego heat when styling your hair, it may be impossible to restore the hair.