***THIS PROMO IS EXTENDED THRU JULY 31. 2020.***

These Promotional Packages are available at the Tunasan, Starmall Alabang, Las Pinas @ the Village Square Mall, and Makati Branches.

If you need to purchase hair care products, you may visit SimplyBeauty.ph for your hair care needs delivered to your doorsteps.

If you would like to receive our monthly promotional packages in an email, please click here to

For the Balayage or Ombre  pricing,  please send us a PM message from our facebook or Instagram (@dotzerohairstudio) accounts for the promo information.

The following hair services are by appointment only:
Ombre
Balayage
Fashion Color
Creative Hair Color
Digiperm
Hair and Makeup

The following branches accepts VISA and MASTERCARD credit card payments:

DOT ZERO Hair Studio, Makati
DOT ZERO Hair Studio, Las Pinas @ The Village Square Mall Alabang
MARS Effect Hair Studio, Alabang @ The Starmall Alabang Mall

Advertisements
Advertisements

Obviously you wouldn’t purposely spend precious time and money to transform your hair color to a gorgeous shade of caramel or achieve perfect honey highlights only to ruin it the second you step out of the salon.

Unfortunately, many of the seemingly harmless aspects of your daily beauty routine — from showering to using your favorite hair products — may take a bigger toll on your dye job than you think. Here, all the things you should look out for to protect your hair color.

1. Water
While shampoo has long been deemed one of the main causes of premature fading, saturating strands with water alone can wreak havoc on dyed hair. Water swells the hair fiber and lifts the cuticle, allowing water-soluble dye molecules in the matrix of your hair to escape, And if your hair’s cuticle is compromised (which is most likely the case if you color it, heat-style it, and so on), it’s even more susceptible. If your hair is damaged, it swells more easily when wet, making dye even more likely to get out.

2. Heavy Styling Products
Although it seems counter-intuitive, some hair oils and shine serums that you often reach for to soften your over-processed strands could, over time, have the reverse effect. That’s because these types of formulas often contain ingredients like heavy silicones, that coat the outer cuticle layer of hair. Some types of silicones can build up on hair and when product builds up, it can also attract dirt and particulates from the air, all of which can cause color to look more dull even if it’s actually intact in the hair fiber.

3. Physical Aggression
Ripping through tangles with a brush or comb or constantly putting your hair up in tight ponytails and buns. Eventually, it damages the cuticle. Roughing up the hair is going to compromise the integrity of the structure itself, which means dye molecules will release out of strands and lead to your color fading much faster than it should. To help lessen the wear and tear, apply a light leave-in detangling or hydrating treatment daily on wet or dry strands to create better brush glide, and opt for softer, looser ponytails and buns.

4. Heat-Styling
Hot tools scorch strands — literally. And the more damaged the hair’s cuticle layer is, the more susceptible it is to allowing water absorption to increase the loss of color and make your hair’s hue appear dull. Even though the color molecules may be inside strands, when hair is damaged, the surface isn’t in great shape, so it’s not laying flat down to reflect light. The goal: to keep strands smooth and align the cuticle for a natural shine benefit.

5. Skipping Trims
Think about it — the ends of your strands are the oldest, which means they’ve had to withstand the most heat damage and chemical processing. Over time, the ends become more and more damaged. This is why the dye molecules take differently to this section of hair … not because of the split ends. The result: the bottom of your hair doesn’t have the same fresh color as the rest of your hair. Getting regular trims is recommended — every 10 to 12 weeks depending on the length and health of your hair — as well as using a treatment to help keep splits to a minimum.

6. Never Using Conditioner
Not only is using a daily rinse-out conditioner with hydrating styling products essential to keeping your color bright, using a hair mask, regardless of your texture, is crucial. Once you strengthen your hair and get it as close to its virgin state as you can, the easier it’s going to be to get the color that you want and the more choices you have in colors. When hair is extremely damaged from drastic color changes (like that time you went from blonde to black and back to brunette), it suddenly doesn’t hold onto dye as well and can end up looking ombré even thought it’s not.

7. UV Light
The sun’s rays can lead to the break down of hair’s matrix, which, as we now know, can exacerbate hair color fading along with a long list of other not-so-pretty side effects such as making hair dry, brittle, dull, and difficult to style. Unfortunately, hair products are yet to be laced with super effective sunscreen, so the best sun protection for hair is a wide-brimmed hat, says Mancuso. To help replenish lost moisture from over exposure to the sun’s UV rays, use a lightweight leave-in conditioner daily. We recommend applying a hydrating mask to damp hair before wrapping it up into a low bun or loose braid. This helps hide some strands from excessive UV exposure, especially the ends, which are the most prone to damage.

Frequently Asked Questions about Hair Coloring (FAQ)

Hair Coloring FAQ #1- Will coloring make my hair fall out?

Hair Coloring FAQ #1 – The answer is an “NO.” There is no scientific evidence that hair coloring causes extra hair loss.

A bad color job, however, can cause hair breakage, which may be confused with extra hair loss.

Will coloring make my hair thinner?

The answer again is No. So many women (and men for that matter) with thinned hair and blame it on the color. It’s only when they started coloring that I have noticed my hair is thinner. This is coincidental; many women start coloring when their hair is turning gray, or when the color is not as vibrant.

They are often at the age, unfortunately, when the hair can begin to thin for other reasons, but they blame it on the coloring. Or, they start coloring their hair at a young age and notice the hair is thinner when they are in their 30s and 40s, again blaming coloring. But it would have thinned anyway.

Coloring my hair makes it dry; what can I do?

Coloring can dry the hair — permanent color and bleach in particular.

While semi-permanent color doesn’t dry it out as much as permanent, repeated use can cause dry ends. Always use a moisture-balancing or moisturizing shampoo and conditioner. And a deep, moisturizing hair mask once or twice a week depending on the dryness. Always apply a leave-in conditioning cream (non-greasy) before blow-drying. And remember not to over-dry or over-brush.

Daily shampooing and conditioning will not dry your hair providing you choose the correct products.hair coloring faq

What should I look for in a hair color product?

Choose your color from the packet or swatch on display. Colors may change according to fashion, but the basic chemistry of coloring agents has not changed much over the years.

They all have similar ingredients, so there’s no point reading the label.

However, the best person to advise you is your hairdresser, and the best place to have hair color done is in a salon.

Should I choose permanent or semi-permanent color?

In the long term, permanent hair color is best, which may surprise you when you take into account the extra peroxide and ammonia it might contain. The reason is that permanent color should only be applied to the new hair growth at the roots, briefly overlapping with the previously dyed hair.

Semi-permanent color, on the other hand, is applied to the whole head each time, because of the more rapid fading.

Is it safe to have my hair colored during pregnancy?

Yes. All women want to look their best when they’re pregnant, and what better way to boost morale than to have your hair the way you want? We do recommend low-ammonia, paraben-free, and if you have access to a no-ammonia would be better.

Can hair colorants cause cancer?

There are recurring scares about hair coloring causing bladder cancer. The first was about 25 years ago and the latest in 2002. There were some studies that indicated a link, but none could be substantiated on humans.

Evidence that hair coloring is safe has been demonstrated in two major studies by the American Cancer Society and Harvard University.

Is using a hair color likely to give me a rash?

There is a possibility, but not if you go about it correctly. All hair dye packaging recommends carrying out a skin patch test before using a colorant.

Apply the color to an area the size of a quarter, behind an ear or inner elbow. If, after 24 hours, there is no irritation, discomfort or redness, it is safe to color without risk of a rash or reaction.

When you read about people suffering severe allergic reactions, it is most likely that the patch-test warnings have been ignored in these cases.

Can hair coloring give me a dry and itchy scalp?

Many women have existing flaky and itchy scalp conditions and blame their hair color. In my answer to question one, I mentioned an eight-month study I conducted to establish that hair coloring does not cause thinning or hair loss.

Coloring should definitely be avoided on scratched or very irritated skin conditions.

I don’t want to use peroxide or ammonia. What else can I use to color my hair?

The obvious coloring agents to use in this case would be vegetable colors such as henna or chamomile. These have many disadvantages, though. The colors they produce are not natural-looking and they fade very quickly, leading to more frequent applications, unnatural colors and, ultimately, drier, brittle hair.

Also, in a similar way to semi-permanent colors, there is a continual overlap in application, leading to an unnatural appearance — particularly on the ends.

Advertisements

Additional Information Hair Coloring FAQ(s)

To obtain natural-looking hair color, peroxide and ammonia are in need, as without these ingredients your color will not take as well,look as good, or last as long. There are specific reasons for their inclusion that involve complicated hair and ingredient chemistry.

Provided you take sufficient care before, during and after the dying process, there is no reason why you shouldn’t have the best of all worlds: beautiful, long-lasting color and well-conditioned hair.

Visit us for a free Hair Consultation

We offer free hair consultation. You may drop by any time before 7:00 pm. We are open seven days week. Also, you can send a private message to our facebook or instagram account. Please note that all quotes provided to you are for estimation purposes only. We still need to assess your hair in person before the work is guaranteed. You will be provided with the actual cost upfront by your stylist so that you can decide from thereon.

Need additional information?

You can contact us or visit any of our branches in Manila for a free hair consultation. Please call us if you would like to schedule an appointment:

Landline: 8852-1788
Globe: 09662783141
Smart: 09391432448

Or, you can send us a message from our facebook page at facebook.com/DotZeroHairStudioByMars.

For more information please click here. We always have a promotional offer every month and it is updated frequently.

Bleaching can leave your hair with mild to severe damage due to acidic action of strong chemicals or wrong handling or extreme heat application during the procedure. The ruined hair might feel dry, spongy, porous, brittle or rough due to damaged hair cuticles which cover the cortex, carrying the hair’s natural color. While store-bought potion and products might help repair the condition, there are quite a few easy, natural ways to get your hair healthy after bleaching.

1. Shampoo your hair less often. In order to restore your bleached hair, you will have to discontinue washing your hair daily. When you shampoo your hair, you are not only cleaning the hair but you are also stripping the natural oils and sebum from your hair. The oils and sebum are natural moisturizers. If your hair is prone to looking and feeling oily, use a dry shampoo on the days that you don’t wash your hair.

2. Deep condition your hair one or more times per week. The amount that you condition your hair depends on how often your hair needs it. Apply deep conditioner to your hair after you have already washed it with shampoo and regular conditioner. Use a wide-toothed comb to distribute it through your hair. Warm a towel in the dryer or with a hair dryer. Wrap your hair with the warm towel. Leave the deep conditioner and towel on your hair for 30 minutes. Wash it completely out of your hair.

3. Always wash hair with lukewarm or cold water. Hot water promotes dryness in the hair. That is counterproductive to restoring bleached hair as your goal is to add moisture to your hair. If you wash hair with lukewarm water, always rinse your hair with cold water at the very end. That will seal the cuticle.

4. Use a leave-in conditioner after every time that you wash your hair. As bleached hair is often porous and prone to tangles, a leave-in conditioner adds moisture and makes hair easier to comb. That will prevent strands of hair from breaking off.

5. Do not use heat on your hair. Avoid using blow dryers, hot rollers, flat irons and curling irons. Heat is detrimental to restoring your bleached hair. If you are not willing to forego heat when styling your hair, it may be impossible to restore the hair.